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Accident Reporting

All accidents must be reported to your local Laboratory Manager/Safety Manager without delay.

After an accident, you must complete a University Accident, Dangerous Occurrence and Incident Report Form (see below) and return it your local Laboratory Manager/Safety Manager, who will investigate the accident further if necessary and produce a more detailed report. The original accident form and any copies of all related investigatory reports should be sent to the

The DSO is then required to:

  • record the accident in the departmental accident book, which is held in the departmental Central Administration Office;
  • keep the original hard copy of completed accident report form and any additional invesitgatory documents in the departmental 'accident report folder'; and
  • send a hard copy of the completed accident report form and any additional invesitgatory documents to the University Safety Office.

For further information about accident and incident reporting, including access to the latest version of reporting forms, see the University’s Safety Office website (you will need your Raven login details to access these pages).


RIDDOR - Over 3 Day Injuries

If you have an accident at work and are subsequently away for 3 consecutive days (not including the day of the injury, but including weekends) please notify your local Laboratory Manager/Safety Manager and DSO as soon as possible. Injuries lasting longer than 3 days must be recorded, ready for inspection by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) if necessary. Injuries lasting for 7 days or more are immediately reportable to the HSE under RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations Regulations 1995).


Incident/Near Miss Reporting

If you are subject to, or witness an event that had the potential to cause you/others injury, please, without putting yourself at risk, make the area safe and report this to your local Laboratory Manager/Safety Manager and DSO as soon as possible. It is important to report near misses, as they can alert us to 'accidents waiting to happen' and the need to take action.